Managed to get out 17 days with the camera to 13 different places. Lots of signs of spring catching my eye and adding interest to the walks in local parks.

The coltsfoot (often mistaken for dandelions) are always the first to appear in our area, followed quickly by the spring flowers in the forests.
coltsfoot
coltsfoot
pussy willow
pussy willow
pussy willow
pussy willow
speckled elder
speckled elder
maple tree
maple tree
maple tree
maple tree
maple tree
maple tree
Tamarack
Tamarack
fruit/berry tree
fruit/berry tree
fruit/berry tree
fruit/berry tree
Bloodroot
Bloodroot
spring beauty
spring beauty
hepatica
hepatica
hepatica
hepatica
hepatica
hepatica
Trout lily
Trout lily
Trout lily
Trout lily
scilla
scilla
red trillium
red trillium
red trillium
red trillium
white trillium
white trillium
white trillium
white trillium
violet
violet
The mourning cloak butterfly appears first, but others quickly followed.
A good number, and variety, of woodpeckers were around; Downy, hairy, pileated (with a bad hair day)  and sapsuckers. Flickers were calling but I never found one to photograph.
The pair of osprey at Iroquois have claimed the nesting platform, but were not using it yet as the Mrs hadn’t laid any eggs when we were there mid-month.
Red-winged blackbirds, chickadees and plenty of cardinals called constantly.
Lots of ducks, including a mallard on a roof top! Never met a wood duck I didn’t want to photograph… There were a number of hooded mergansers in a few places as well as a pair of ring necked ducks I had not seen around here before. Some buffleheads were seen, but too far away for a decent image.
Compton tortoiseshell
Compton tortoiseshell
mourning cloak
mourning cloak
Eastern Pine Elfin
Eastern Pine Elfin
spring azure
spring azure
hairy woodpecker
hairy woodpecker
downy woodpecker
downy woodpecker
downy woodpecker
downy woodpecker
downy woodpecker
downy woodpecker
sapsucker
sapsucker
pileated woodpecker
pileated woodpecker
pileated woodpecker
pileated woodpecker
osprey
osprey
female red-wing blackbird
female red-wing blackbird
male red-wing blackbird
male red-wing blackbird
song sparrow
song sparrow
phoebe
phoebe
chickadee
chickadee
chickadee
chickadee
chickadee
chickadee
chickadee
chickadee
cardinal
cardinal
cardinal
cardinal
raven chick
raven chick
mallard duck
mallard duck
mallard duck
mallard duck
mallard duck
mallard duck
mallard duck
mallard duck
black duck
black duck
ring-neck duck
ring-neck duck
wood duck
wood duck
wood duck
wood duck
wood duck
wood duck
wood duck
wood duck
wood duck
wood duck
hooded merganser
hooded merganser
hooded merganser
hooded merganser
With no leaves out yet, large, odd shaped trees certainly stood out to catch my eye. 
The tree in the third picture caught my attention as it looked like it has two arms reaching out. Pine trees come in sorts of shapes! One stump, turned on its side has a definite animal head shape.

sumach
sumach
reaching out
reaching out
pine tree
pine tree
pine tree
pine tree
pine tree
pine tree
stump
stump
animal head
animal head
cedar tree
cedar tree
maple leaves
maple leaves
Lots of four legged creatures about, including the Easter bunny. Plus some no-legged garter snakes getting “frisky”.
Blanding’s turtles are quite scarce, I found this one sunning itself.
The last three pictures show a porcupine den tree at which someone has set up a camera trap hoping to get a shot of the porcupine (who didn’t appear for me as they are nocturnal).

black squirrel
black squirrel
black squirrel
black squirrel
red squirrel
red squirrel
red squirrel
red squirrel
garter snake
garter snake
garter snake
garter snake
garter snake
garter snake
wood frog
wood frog
leopard frog
leopard frog
bull frog
bull frog
painted turtle
painted turtle
painted turtles
painted turtles
blanding's turtle
blanding's turtle
beaver lodge and dam
beaver lodge and dam
patriotic beaver
patriotic beaver
muskrat
muskrat
muskrat
muskrat
raccoon
raccoon
raccoon
raccoon
porcupine den
porcupine den
camera den
camera den
set up
set up
It took two mornings and several hours to find the old bike that was some 6 feet up in a tree that had grown around it. Obviously the bike had been there for a good number of years.
I continued collecting various examples of art work around the city, including amateur-built inukshuks. 
About 2 kilometers along trail leading to a large beaver pond, there was a hockey net that had obviously been hauled in for shinny games in the winter.
The much decorated glacial erratic at Mud Lake sheered off part of one side. Wonder how many years that was in the making.
The last image is a shot of the “pink” moon just before moving down behind the neighbour’s house.

Ferns always catch my eye….
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